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Trust me, I’m a scientist.

Why should people trust the published scientific record? Imagine this hypothetical, but potentially very real, conversation with a non-academic: 1: “This research paper has been published, and therefore is scientifically valid.” 2: “But it’s paywalled, I can’t access it. How do I know it’s valid?” 1: “Because it has been peer reviewed.” 2. “Can you […]

Other stuff wot I wrote

As I’m sure many of you are aware, this is not the only platform I write on. This is my own personal blog, which explains the perpetually low quality of the ramblings on here. I also write a lot for ScienceOpen, and also the PLOS Paleo Community. The former of these includes a lot of […]

The greatest mass extinction in the history of life

This was originally posted at: http://blogs.egu.eu/palaeoblog/?p=1204 In palaeontology, there are so many things more important than dinosaurs. For example, the study of large-scale patterns in the history of life on Earth, commonly known as macroevolution, is all about uncovering patterns of speciation and extinction. We are currently about to enter the sixth mass extinction within the […]

The Cambridge Science Festival

This originally appeared at: http://blogs.egu.eu/palaeoblog/?p=1152 Last night, I was honoured to have spoken at the final evening lecture at the Cambridge Science Festival, along with Nick Crumpton, Anjali Goswami, Rob Asher, and Stephanie Pierce, about why palaeontology is important. Below is a rough transcript of some of what my talk was about. Unlike the others, I […]

Citizen science in ecology and evolution? Sounds apps-olutely fantastic.. *tumbleweed*

This was originally posted at: http://blogs.egu.eu/palaeoblog/?p=1036 There’s a lot of talk these days about science communication. Some people spend their lives debating the differences between outreach, public engagement, and science communication, and how they all mean different things. As a scientist, and I’m quite sure I can speak on behalf of the entire community, we don’t […]