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Learned societies turn against scholarship | Medium

Researchers today are caught like fish in a net of slow, overpriced, unethical and dysfunctional publishing practices. Trapped by academic employment rules, funding arrangements and copyright laws, we have long tried unsuccessfully to wrest control of scholarship from corporate publishers. The fight dates back to at least the 1980s, when physicists started circulating their findings […]

Reforming scholarly publishing

SOURCE Our present publishing system is not working well. The growth of Open Access (OA) has been slow, resisted by many publishers at the expense of the public purse. Researchers have outsourced our evaluation system to this dysfunctional industry, which continuously infringes basic academic freedoms and human rights. Plan S is the latest attempt to […]

Reflections on Plan S

Note: A shorter, edited version of this was published in parallel on the LSE Impact Blog. No one disagrees with the idea that freeing up scientific knowledge to the public is a good thing for society. Around 25 years ago, this principle crystallised around the term Open Access (OA), and the birth of the modern, […]

Impact of Social Sciences – The “problem” of predatory publishing remains a relatively small one and should not be allowed to defame open access

A recent investigation led by an international group of journalists raised concerns over the scale of the problem of deceptive publishing practices, with many researchers of standing and reputation found to have published in “predatory” journals. However, while the findings of this investigation garnered significant media attention, the robustness of the study itself was not […]