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Palaeontology and Open Science roundup: October, 2018

Welcome to your usual roundup of interesting stuff that happened in the last month from the worlds of Open Science and Palaeontology! Enjoy, and let me know if I’ve missed anything out. Previous time. Palaeontology News Rudenko: Prehistoric Body Theater: Bringing Paleontology Narratives to Global Contemporary Performance Audiences. This is just a special bit of magic! Brocklehurst: Vertebral […]

Palaeontology and Open Science roundup: July 30th, 2018

Welcome to your usual weekly roundup of interesting stuff that happened in the last week! Enjoy, and let me know if I’ve missed anything out. Previous week. Palaeontology News Lessner et al: New insights into Late Triassic dinosauromorph-bearing assemblages from Texas using apomorphy-based identifications. Xu et al: A new Middle Jurassic diplodocoid suggests an earlier dispersal and […]

Palaeontology and Open Science news roundup: June 22nd, 2018

Welcome to your usual weekly roundup of vaguely interesting stuff that happened in the last week! Enjoy, and let me know if I’ve missed anything out. Previous week. Palaeontology news Montanari: Cracking the egg: the use of modern and fossil eggs for ecological, environmental and biological interpretation. Yin et al: Cranial morphology of Sinovenator changii (Theropoda: Troodontidae) on […]

A 180 million year old dinosaur dinner

This article was originally posted here. While artistic reconstructions of dinosaurs preying on each other are a fantastic way of illustrating the real-life behaviours of these fantastic creatures, direct evidence of dinosaur-food interactions in the fossil record are surprisingly rare. In modern ecosystems, it’s quite easy to establish ecological interactions between predators, prey, and plants […]

Why I think the Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary is super important

Mass extinctions are insanely catastrophic, but important, events that punctuate the history of life on Earth. The Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary, around 145 million years ago, was originally thought of to represent a mass extinction, but has subsequently been ‘down-graded’ to a minor extinction event based on new discoveries. However, compared to other important stratigraphic boundaries, like […]

Your bite or mine?

This was originally posted at:  It rises from the dark waters like some behemoth from the deep, and lets out a blood-curdling roar. It’s feeding time. One of the most iconic scenes from Jurassic Park III is where the long-snouted, sail-backed giant theropod dinosaur Spinosaurus emerges from underwater to try, yet again, to eat our […]