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Merry Christmas, 11 by ~@Himmapaan on deviantART

Merry Christmas, 11 by ~Himmapaan on deviantART.

This has to be one of the most incredible pieces of palaeo-art, or even art I’ve ever laid my eyes upon!

Full credit for this delight goes to @himmapaan (link above) <3

The image depicts what I presume is Parasaurolophus walkeri, infamously referred to as “Elvis” by Roland Tembo (the late Pete Postlethwaite) in Jurassic Park: The Lost World, a name coined by the bizarre head-gear this particular hadrosaur possessed.

As well as being an excellent image, it also appears quite anatomically correct: the derived tridactyl pes, a quadrupedal stance, heavy caudo-femoralis musculature, and er, two lateral bags of fruit and veg..

The two little dwarf-men things are the less well-known sympatric fossils also from the Dinosaur Park Formation – palaeontologists just don’t want anyone to know yet, as it blows current estimates for the origins of humans out of the water. This may or may not be true.

I’m certainly going to be requesting a copy of this, and perhaps some more of his fantastic work (also definitely worth checking out!). Raw talent.

0 thoughts on “Merry Christmas, 11 by ~@Himmapaan on deviantART

  1. Thank you so much, Jon! The baskets contain some fruit, but they are mostly filled with parcels: gifts of various kinds! You’ll also notice a few bottles which may contain something to your liking. 😉

    Small people of no specific description seem to frequently occur in my universe, as it were. I suppose they may have something elvish about them, but they are also influenced by artists like William Heath Robinson and Andrej and Olga Dugina.

  2. Beautiful stuff as usual Himma!

    Reminds me a little of the work of Anton Pieck.
    There’s a real ornamental feel to much of your stuff, as if you’re portraying images from an old mythical tradition.

    1. Thank you so much, Matt! How interesting, someone else also recently mentioned the Pieck echoes! I must admit that that was also my first acquaintance with the artist. I can see what you mean, as Pieck was of course working very closely within the traditions of the ‘Golden Age’ illustrators, who are among my own influences.

      Now if someone would just have the idea of building a theme park based on my work, huh? 😉

  3. It’s easy to draw comparisons, but can be frustrating for the artist.

    The theme park wopuld keep you in work for a little while! Though James Gurney has done the smart thing and managed to produce the mythos to go with his art and made the merch to go with it!

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