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Crikey! We’re gonna need a bigger boat… | PLOS Paleo Community

The first fossils of a giant ancestor of the great white shark have been discovered in Victoria, Australia. Philip Mullaly, a fossil enthusiast, was having a stroll down the beach at Victoria’s popular surf coast, when something caught his eye. Sticking out of a boulder was part of a shark tooth, perfectly preserved, and still shining after millions of years of preservation as a fossil. Carcharocles angustidens teeth. Credit: Museums Victoria Mullaly immediately recognised that these were an important scientific discovery, and contacted Erich Fitzgerald of Museums Victoria. After a preliminary examination, Fitzgerald then led a team on two further expeditions to the site at Jan Juc. There, they discovered more than 40 individual teeth within the original boulder of discovery, all coming from the same species. They belonged to a now extinct species called Carcharocles angustidens, which has a common name, the Great Jagged Narrow-Toothed Shark. This mega-toothed shark species would have

Source: Crikey! We’re gonna need a bigger boat… | PLOS Paleo Community